Plenary Speakers

Dr John Øvretveit 

Director of research and professor of healthcare innovation implementation and evaluation at the Medical Management Centre, The Karolinska Institute, Stockholm

Improve-mentation for an effective response to Covid-19

John will describe how his team have used implementation and improvement methods and knowledge to contribute to the healthcare response to the outbreak in Stockholm, Sweden. 

Abstract: The Covid-19 crisis has challenged implementation and improvement researchers and practitioners from around the world to apply knowledge and methods from the field to help develop an effective response to the outbreak. The crisis has also stimulated innovation, and highlighted a need to develop our sciences through research to better understand why some implementation and improvement initiatives work, while are others are less successful. 

In this session, John will describe how his team have used implementation and improvement methods and knowledge to contribute to the healthcare response to the outbreak in Stockholm, Sweden. He will discuss the issues that the outbreak has raised for improvement and implementation researchers and for practitioners, and look at what implementation and improvement experts can contribute to the post-Covid paradigm. He will consider the implementation of clinical interventions and practices, as well as service delivery and population health interventions during the first weeks of the emergent response, and in the second and third wave of Covid-19 needs.

John will consider ways forward for the following challenges:

  • Where evidence of effectiveness is limited, is there a role for implementation and improvement sciences and practitioners?
  • How do we best adapt an intervention that is proven to be successful elsewhere?
  • Regarding sustaining a new practice, scaling up and assessing the return on investment, what do we have to offer as researchers and practitioners?
  • For implementing complex multilevel interventions, what are the challenges and solutions for studying and assisting implementation?
  • How do we develop our research and practice for the new digital health era?

Abstract: The Covid-19 crisis has challenged implementation and improvement researchers and practitioners from around the world to apply knowledge and methods from the field to help develop an effective response to the outbreak. The crisis has also stimulated innovation, and highlighted a need to develop our sciences through research to better understand why some implementation and improvement initiatives work, while are others are less successful. 

In this session, John will describe how his team have used implementation and improvement methods and knowledge to contribute to the healthcare response to the outbreak in Stockholm, Sweden. He will discuss the issues that the outbreak has raised for improvement and implementation researchers and for practitioners, and look at what implementation and improvement experts can contribute to the post-Covid paradigm. He will consider the implementation of clinical interventions and practices, as well as service delivery and population health interventions during the first weeks of the emergent response, and in the second and third wave of Covid-19 needs.

John will consider ways forward for the following challenges:

  • Where evidence of effectiveness is limited, is there a role for implementation and improvement sciences and practitioners?
  • How do we best adapt an intervention that is proven to be successful elsewhere?
  • Regarding sustaining a new practice, scaling up and assessing the return on investment, what do we have to offer as researchers and practitioners?
  • For implementing complex multilevel interventions, what are the challenges and solutions for studying and assisting implementation?
  • How do we develop our research and practice for the new digital health era?

Biography: Dr John Øvretveit splits his time equally between two positions: director of research for primary and community healthcare services, and professor of implementation and improvement at The Karolinska Institute, Sweden. He is also a Swedish citizen and resident of Stockholm, the capital of the country. 

Translations of some of his 400 peer-reviewed scientific papers and books have been made into ten languages. Six of his books have won publications awards, including twice winner of the European Health Management Association Award and the Baxter health publication of the year prize, for “Action Evaluation” (2002) and “Health Service Quality” (1992). 

He was awarded the 2014 Avedis Donabedian international quality award for his work on quality economics, served for 12 years as a board member of the USA Joint Commission International and chair of their healthcare quality and safety standards committee. He is founder and chair of the Quality Improvement Research Network and a board member of the Global Implementation Society. 

John was previously professor of health policy and management at Bergen University Medical School, Norway and at the Nordic School of Public Health, Goteborg, Sweden. He currently holds visiting professor appointments at Kaiser Permanente Department of Research and Evaluation, The Australian Institute of Health Innovation, Macquarie University, Australia, and is a visiting scholar at CERC, Stanford University.